Chemo Scrambled My Brain

April 24, 2017

After years working as a nurse in critical care units, Anne Webster found herself lying in the hospital struggling to get well. She had been given the wrong dose of a chemotherapy medication to treat Crohn’s disease. The mistake had caused her bone marrow to shut down, and she’d developed pneumonia. As she lay in the hospital, she thought, “If I live, I’m gonna write about this.”

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Even as high drug prices make headlines, the challenge of getting sick children the kind of medication they can take and tolerate — often by creating liquid formulations of drugs that are already on the market — is seen by some companies as a lucrative opportunity

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Anita Foeman: Race and identity in many ways define who we think we are, while modern genetics can challenge those notions. To delve into these issues, I am involved with a communications studies project at West Chester University in Pennsylvania that explores narratives at the intersection of race and identity

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Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab are working with Facebook to develop breakthrough brain-computer interface technologies

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Limiting the number of foreign doctors who can get visas to practice in the United States could have a significant impact on certain hospitals and states that rely on them, according to a new study

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JHU faculty, staff, students discuss their plans to participate in Saturday’s March for Science in Washington, D.C.

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It’s often portrayed as a story of exploitation. Henrietta Lacks, a poor, young African-American woman, learned she had terminal cancer. Cells collected from a biopsy of her cancer were cultured without her knowledge or permission to develop a cell line, called HeLa. Over the ensuing decades, research using HeLa cells led to scores of medical advances, saving lives — and making a lot of money for a lot of people, though not for Ms. Lacks’s family

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What happened in the 1951 case of Henrietta Lacks, and could it happen again today? The story of the woman who unwittingly spurred a scientific bonanza made for a best-selling book in 2010. On Saturday, it returns in an HBO film with Oprah Winfrey portraying Lacks’ daughter Deborah. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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