Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics, joined host Kerri Miller to discuss innovations in gene editing and the consequences that must be considered

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In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave the green light to a version of the plant Camelina sativa, an important oilseed crop that had been genetically engineered using CRISPR to produce enhanced omega-3 oil. What was interesting about this approval was that the USDA did not ask that the inventors of the plant endure the usual regulatory hoops required to sell biotech crops

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The womb was thought to be sterile, but some scientists argue that it’s where the microbiome begins

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A century after one of history’s most catastrophic disease outbreaks, scientists are rethinking how to guard against another super-flu like the 1918 influenza that killed tens of millions as it swept the globe

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Holly Fernandez Lynch writes, “Nevertheless, even the upswing still leaves quite a bit of the glass empty: Results from more than 1 in 4 trials have still not been properly reported. The ethical consequences are substantial, and the government should be using its considerable enforcement authority to put an end to it. But it isn’t.”

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The study also suggests that any reduction in payments associated with proposed cuts to the Children Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which operates in tandem with Medicaid in most states, could mean less access to care, said Brendan Saloner, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Bloomberg School of Public Health

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Engineered organisms that cannot breed with wild counterparts could prevent transgenic plants from spreading genes to unmodified crops and weeds, and battle pests

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For a small person who had surgery before he was even born, and who’d just spent an hour and a half squeezing through a tight space that clamped down on his head every few minutes, Baby Boy Royer was showing a feisty spirit

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