Revival of disembodied organs raises slew of ethical and legal questions about the nature of death and consciousness.

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“2019 is the year when the training wheels come off and the world gets to see what CRISPR can really do for the world in the most positive sense,” says Fyodor Urnov, a gene-editing scientist at the Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences in Seattle and the University of California, Berkeley

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“It’s easy to get on your high horse when you’re not in our position,” she said. “If editing an IVF embryo is the best option to mitigate the pain that a child would otherwise suffer, then give us the choice.”

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Texas Tech recently announced it will no longer take race into account in admissions to its medical school—a move that might affect not only aspiring doctors, but many of their would-be patients as well

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Watch now: The NAM & CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security hosted a conversation on whether human germline genome editing should be permitted, the types of applications which might be appropriate, the standards and criteria that should be followed, and what regulatory or governance framework is needed. Panel includes our Jeffrey Kahn

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There’s been a lot of talk about overinvestment in interventions aimed at amyloid in the weeks since Biogen discontinued a late-stage study of aducanumab, an experimental therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

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Researchers from under-represented groups are making genomics more inclusive by working with communities that have been overlooked or abused

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In 2010, Dr. Pamela Munster mailed her saliva to 23andMe, a relatively new DNA testing company, and later opted in for a BRCA test. As an oncologist, she knew a mutation of this gene would put her at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. She was relieved by the negative result

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