Be the first to like.

Share

A 65-year-old woman with colon cancer tells a hospital chaplain she has “made peace with God” and requests palliative rather than aggressive treatment. She does not want to burden her husband by prolonging her life.

Her husband, however, is not ready to lose his life partner. He urges her to continue chemotherapy, as does her medical team. Reluctantly, the patient tells her chaplain she’ll do what others think is best.

That case, based on the real-life experiences of chaplains at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, was the topic of a recent Ethics for Lunch discussion. Each month, the Berman Institute of Bioethics and The Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Ethics Committee and Consultation Service convene a panel of Johns Hopkins experts for a one-hour talk about ethical challenges in the world of medicine.

December’s talk explored the role of spiritual care at Johns Hopkins hospitals. Patients do not need to be near death or even particularly religious to benefit from time with chaplains, who work both within and outside faith traditions to relieve suffering by serving as sounding boards, counselors and prayer partners, says Ty Crowe, director of pastoral care for The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

… Read More

Our next ‘Ethics for Lunch’ is scheduled for Tues, Jan 17, Noon. See www.bioethicsinstitute.org/efl for more information

Be the first to like.

Share
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply