Be the first to like.

Share

Our 16-day trip began as a search for savings. Not for a budget vacation, but for affordable dentistry. Between my husband, Tim, and I, both freelancers, we needed $5,000 to $6,000 in routine, but nonetheless prohibitively costly, dental care. Frustrated at our situation, I tossed out a tongue-in-cheek Facebook post announcing my intention to become a “dental tourist.” I was half joking, but within minutes, recommendations for hospitals, clinics and hotels in Bangkok were rolling in.

Even within my immediate circle of friends and family, a surprising number of people had traveled abroad to get fillings and crowns, whitening and implants. With good reason, it turns out. If the work needed is extensive enough, it is possible to save money even after accounting for the cost of travel. In other cases, the savings are just enough to pay for a tropical vacation, which is compelling when you are staring down the barrel of subfreezing temperatures.

“Do it,” a friend wrote. “It makes total sense … I mean cents.”

… Read More

Image: By Frankee 67 19:57, 1. Mai 2010 (CEST) – Self-photographed, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10727169

Be the first to like.

Share
NYTimes

Tags: , , , , , ,

One Response to “A Family Adventure in Medical Tourism”

  1. […] Our trip began as a search for affordable dentistry. We needed $5,000 to $6,000 in routine, but nonetheless prohibitively costly, dental care. So I booked flights and made appointments. I become a “dental tourist”. […]

Leave a Reply