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Kang Zhang at the University of California in San Diego and his colleagues trained an AI on medical records from 1.3 million patient visits at a major medical centre in Guangzhou, China. The patients were all under 18 years old and visited their doctor between January 2016 and January 2017.

Their medical charts include text written by doctors and laboratory test results. To help the AI, Zhang and his team had human doctors annotate medical records to identify portions of text associated with the child’s complaint, their history of illness, and laboratory tests.

When tested on previously unseen cases, the AI could diagnose glandular fever (also known as mononucleosis), roseola, influenza, chicken pox and hand-foot-mouth disease with between 90 and 97 per cent accuracy. It’s not perfect, but neither are human doctors, says Zhang.

…continue reading ‘AI Can Diagnose Some Childhood Illnesses Better than Some Doctors’

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New Scientist

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