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The article went hugely viral, and became a flashpoint in the debate about breast cancer risk and prevention. It also spurred a bunch of researchers to study what impact Jolie’s decision might have on mastectomy rates and testing for the cancer-causing BRCA1 and 2 genetic mutations.

In the latest paper, published in the BMJ, researchers from Harvard looked at insurance data from nearly 10 million women before and after Jolie’s May 2013 editorial.

In the two weeks following the article, they found that BRCA testing rates shot up by 65 percent. But mastectomy rates remained unchanged in the months after that. This suggests, they wrote, that “BRCA tests obtained as a result of the Jolie editorial did not yield additional BRCA positive mutations that might warrant preventive mastectomy.”

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