Travis Rieder, author of “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids,” joins Ali Velshi to discuss his own opioid dependence and withdrawal after a serious motorcycle accident, and why it’s so important to understand that opioids are “complex medications,” which means they have both risks and benefits

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Here are some contenders…Konrad Gomez-Haibach is only 15. But he’s vying, alongside more than two dozen college professors and science professionals, for a chance to help define the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) research agenda for the next decade through its 2026 Big Idea Machine competition

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As opioid addiction and deadly overdoses escalated into an epidemic across the U.S., thousands of surgeons continued to hand out far more pills than needed for postoperative pain relief, according to a KHN-Johns Hopkins analysis of Medicare data

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Until the day he died, in 2011, Robert Ettinger hoped humanity would figure out a way to cheat death. Today, his body is stored in a cryonic vessel filled with liquid nitrogen and frozen to –196 degrees Celsius

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After an accident and the surgeries that followed, Travis Rieder became addicted to pain medications. Rieder is the director of the Master of Bioethics degree program at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, and he joins Courtney Collins to talk about the agonizing process of weaning himself off the drugs

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An experimental drug for women revives an intense debate. In the coming days, the Food and Drug Administration will decide whether to approve an injection meant to increase women’s drive for sex. Its demonstrated effects are modest, but some doctors say the drug would meet a real need for thousands of women

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The Medicaid work requirement plan devised by Arkansas and approved by the Trump administration backfired because it caused thousands of poor adults to lose coverage without any evidence the target population gained jobs, a new study finds

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Earlier this month, Meharry Medical College, a 143-year-old historically black institution in Tennessee, proudly announced that it had received the second-largest grant in its history — $7.5 million to start a center to study public health issues that affect African-Americans

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