WIRED asked a lawyer, an ethicist, and a research scientist to weigh in on the rights of non-human primates

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Nearly every state lets prisons and jails charge inmates for their own incarceration — room, board, clothing, and doctor’s visits — in a phenomenon called “pay-to-stay”

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States with a shortage of doctors are giving nurse practitioners greater responsibilities and autonomy

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The agency says its rules, set to take effect in 2016, “strike a balance between ensuring Covered California consumers can afford the medication they need to treat chronic and life-threatening conditions while keeping premiums affordable for all.”

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Movement to publicly record peer-reviewing activity gains momentum

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Physician-assisted suicide is illegal in all but five states. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen in the rest. Sick patients sometimes ask for help in hastening their deaths, and some doctors will hint, vaguely, how to do it

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LAST week, the Food and Drug Administration released highly anticipated draft recommendations that would allow gay men to donate blood after one year of celibacy. While an improvement from the current, highly criticized lifetime ban, the new policy, which was announced in December, still caters to fear and stigma rather than science. It should be reconsidered

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Republicans seek to reshape research agenda. Known as the America COMPETES Act, the sweeping measure sets priorities for research programs at the NSF, the Department of Energy and the NIST. It has drawn sharp criticism from science organizations, which say that the plan would limit the agencies’ ability to fund the most promising research, and from the White House

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