I. Glenn Cohen: The relationship between medicine and capital punishment has been a persistent feature of this past year in health law, both at the level of medical ethics and Supreme Court review

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Scientists in Iceland have produced an unprecedented snapshot of a nation’s genetic makeup, discovering a host of previously unknown gene mutations that may play roles in ailments as diverse as Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and gallstones

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The Supreme Court has given pro-life advocates free rein, even if it distresses patients. But getting people to listen is more complicated

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The issues surrounding GMOs have never been simple. They became more complicated last week when an international agency declared that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used herbicide Roundup, probably causes cancer in humans. Two insecticides, malathion and diazinon, were also classified as “probable” carcinogens by the agency, a respected arm of the WHO

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Patricia Davidson, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, said,”In Wall Street or Silicon Valley people can dismiss it because it’s a culture that’s not known to be accommodating – a male-dominated work environment where it’s stacked against them – but when you see this inequity in nursing it speaks to a larger problem.”

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Infections of the Mind

March 25, 2015

why anti-vaxxers just ‘know’ they’re right. Thom Scott-Phillips: Anti-vaccination beliefs can cause real, substantive harm, as shown by the recent outbreak of measles in the US. These developments are as shocking and distressing as their consequences are predictable. But if the consequences are so predictable, why do the beliefs persist?

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Over the objections of the medical community, state Rep. Stuart Spitzer, R-Kaufman, has filed a bill that would prohibit doctors from asking patients whether they own a firearm and makes the Texas Medical Board, which licenses physicians, responsible for doling out punishment

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A report found that just 45 percent of Medicare patients who’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s said they were informed of the diagnosis by their doctor. By contrast, more than 90 percent of Medicare patients with cancer said they were told by their doctor

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