Physician incentives are needed to improve end of life care in the U.S., health experts said Friday at an Institute of Medicine (IOM) forum

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TWO years ago I wrote about my choice to have a preventive double mastectomy. A simple blood test had revealed that I carried a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. It gave me an estimated 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer. I lost my mother, grandmother and aunt to cancer

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Of the 435 ER physicians asked about the tests they order for their patients, more than 85% admitted that in general, they call for too many tests, even if they know the results won’t really help them decide how to treat their patients

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Technology and Persuasion

March 23, 2015

Persuasive technologies surround us, and they’re growing smarter. How do these technologies work? And why?

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WHO unwilling to assume responsibility for robust Ebola reponse, and governments of Guinea and Sierra Leone contributed to loss of life, according to Médecins Sans Frontières report

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“Death is nothing at all,” the English theologian Henry Scott Holland wrote a century ago in a reflection that is often quoted at funerals. Death is but life extended, Holland said: “I have only slipped away to the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was.”

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If there’s any area of consensus, it’s in misperceptions of the law: 82 percent of Americans either say the price tag has gone up, or aren’t sure (the law’s price has actually decreased as compared with initial estimates), and only 13 percent know the law met its first-year enrollment goals

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New drugs for hepatitis C are a major breakthrough but hugely expensive in rich countries. Pharma giant Gilead will allow cheap copies to be made for poor countries – but only for patients with proof of identification and citizenship and the drug supplies will be closely tracked

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