Experts, regulators mull how to foster technologies without posing undue risk to patients

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A new study finds that involuntary psychiatric treatment programs can keep people from cycling through ERs, jails, prisons, and homeless shelters—and therefore save taxpayers gobs of money. Is it worth it?

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In this bite-size community near Key West, like so many other mosquito-plagued spots up and down the Florida Keys, residents long ago made peace with insecticides dropped into town by planes or rumbling by on trucks. Cans of Off are offered at outdoor parties. Patio screens are greeted with relief

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At a time of rising concern over the cost of medicine, a government-funded study has found that three drugs, ranging in price from $50 to $1,950 a dose, are equally effective in treating many cases of a common form of vision loss caused by diabetes

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When the expert opinions of doctors, government regulations, insurance limitations, and patient desires collide, who gets to decide the if, when, and how of fertility care?

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The DEA restrictions, adopted to curb opioid abuse, mean many vets have to make more appointments with an already overburdened VA

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But could someone use that information to make the brains of a nonhuman species more like us — to create the kind of super chimps that mocked humans in the Planet of the Apes? “One can never say never, but I think it’s a pretty long-shot, far-fetched type concern,” says Ruth Faden, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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What Pushes Scientists to Lie?

February 18, 2015

The disturbing but familiar story of Haruko Obokata. The spectacular fall of the Japanese scientist who claimed to have triggered stem cell abilities in regular body cells is not uncommon in the scientific community. The culprit: carelessness and hubris in the drive to make a historic discovery

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