“Death with dignity” has meant, for many people, avoiding unwanted medical technology and dying in a hospital. A “natural” death has been the goal. In the past 20 years, physician-assisted suicide has been legalized for terminally ill patients in several states of the US, and recently “medical assistance in dying,” has become legal in Canada. How should we think about what constitutes a good death now?

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It is hard to recommend taking a 19-hour flight with a toddler to get a root canal with a straight face. But after going on just such a mission in December, I will aim to get all future dental work done in Thailand

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An analysis recently published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ) is not a condemnation of cancer screening itself. It’s more a condemnation of how we present cancer screening

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“Every time I took a bite, I zapped myself,” she said. “I did it five times on the first night, two times on the second night, and by the third day I didn’t have any cravings anymore.”

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Hospitals celebrate their safety records, but rarely discuss their mistakes. Yet it’s difficult, if not impossible, to improve safety without identifying and learning from errors. That’s why Brigham and Women’s Hospital has launched Safety Matters. This blog aims to describe mistakes made at the hospital along with steps the hospital is taking to prevent them in the future

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And there’s not much they can do about it. Brandon Coats, a 34-year-old quadriplegic whose doctor prescribed medical marijuana to stop his muscle spasms, recently lost his wrongful termination suit against Dish Network, which fired him in 2010 for testing positive for THC. Medical and recreational marijuana are both legal in Colorado, but it’s against Dish’s national company policy

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The latest temperature numbers from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say the first six months of 2016 were the hottest on record around the planet.

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Piggybacking on contentious research, the startup Ambrosia is offering blood transfusions meant to rejuvenate people

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