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SAN DIEGO—Robert King spent 29 years living alone in a six by nine-foot prison cell.

He was part of the “Angola Three”—a trio of men kept in solitary confinement for decades and named for the Louisiana state penitentiary where they were held. King was released in 2001 after a judge overturned his 1973 conviction for killing a fellow inmate. Since his exoneration he has dedicated his life to raising awareness about the psychological harms of solitary confinement.

“People want to know whether or not I have psychological problems, whether or not I’m crazy—‘How did you not go insane?’” King told a packed session at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting here this week. “I look at them and I tell them, ‘I did not tell you I was not insane.’ I don’t mean I was psychotic or anything like that, but being placed in a six by nine by 12–foot cell for 23 hours a day, no matter how you appear on the outside, you are not sane.”

…continue reading ‘Neuroscientists Make a Case against Solitary Confinement’

Image: By Henry Hagnäs from Turku, Finland – Solitary Confinement, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46994345

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Scientific American

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