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The disease was shrinking Kay’s brain, and riddling it with holes. She would likely only live a few more weeks, the doctors said.

It was a diagnosis that no one could ever want. But the fact that Schwister was able to get a firm diagnosis while still alive is a relatively new development that represents a step forward in understanding a group of devastating neurological disorders. And, some biochemists say, it could lead to better ways of diagnosing brain diseases that are much more common, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

For Kay Schwister it all started in the spring of 2016, when she started getting headaches and feeling dizzy all the time. Aging, she told herself, just didn’t feel very good.

Over the next few weeks, she got steadily worse.

… Read More

Image:┬áBy DRdoubleB – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10003861

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