Be the first to like.

Share

“We are very pleased,” said Mary Sue Coleman, a biochemist and president of the Association of American Universities. “It would have been an unworkable system. Every time you have to get consent, it adds costs and complexity to the system that would have affected millions of samples — and, we think, would have limited research.”

Still, the decision to drop the requirement raised concern among others.

“We know that trust is a critical factor in folks participating in research,” says Debra Mathews, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University. “And we’ve seen in recent years the impact of when that trust is breached. In order for the public to trust the scientific community, the scientific community has to demonstrate that it’s trustworthy. And a big part of that is asking permission.”

Be the first to like.

Share
NPR Shots Blog

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply