In 2010, Dr. Pamela Munster mailed her saliva to 23andMe, a relatively new DNA testing company, and later opted in for a BRCA test. As an oncologist, she knew a mutation of this gene would put her at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. She was relieved by the negative result

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The results of a consumer genetic test identified the mother of the man whose donated sperm was used to conceive Danielle Teuscher’s daughter. Legal warnings soon followed

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The genetic genie is out of the bottle. And it’s not going back

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Dani Shapiro writes, “One evening in the winter of 2016, my husband mentioned that he was sending away for one of those commercial DNA-testing kits. He asked if I wanted him to order me one as well. I could easily have said no…”

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The FDA on Wednesday cleared the first DNA test meant to be marketed directly to consumers to help them determine how well certain drugs may work for them. The test was developed by 23andMe and, as with other tests from the consumer genetics giant, customers will be able to simply mail in a spit sample to get results

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In a letter to the Baltimore Sun, a group of geneticists, genetic counselors, and ethicists, including our Debra Mathews, supports efforts to reunite immigrant families as quickly as possible, while raising serious concerns about the use of DNA testing as a means of achieving this goal

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A reporter’s effort to erase her genetic footprint gets snared in a thicket of policies and rules

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The rise of spit kits is leaving consumers with lots of data and few answers. Genetic counselors could help people understand these results, but there aren’t enough of them to go around

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