Esther Choo, an emergency medicine physician, was at a mall in Portland, Oregon, when she fired off a tweet that briefly transformed medical Twitter: “When I first met B, he’d been dead for 20 min. We got him back, inexplicably. He calls me every year on the anniversary. 10 years now. #ShareAStoryInOneTweet” (@choo_ek)

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In February 2016, the FDA recommended that collection of donated blood cease in areas in the United States in which ZIKV was active, unless blood testing or pathogen-reduction methods could be implemented. At the time, no vectorborne cases of ZIKV infection had been reported in the continental United States; however, an epidemic was under way in the U.S. territories, most notably in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands

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An expensive screening program designed to keep the Zika virus out of the Red Cross’ blood supply has caught fewer than a dozen infected donations, a new study published Wednesday revealed. Study authors include our Jeremy Sugarman

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FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and CBER Director, Peter Marks, have just published a new piece on stem cells and regenerative medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM)

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All it took was one paragraph. In 1980, a pair of doctors published a brief letter in the New England Journal of Medicine. Spanning a total of five sentences, the letter claimed, with little substantial evidence, that the development of addiction was very rare in hospitalized patients who briefly received opioids and had no prior history of addiction

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State innovation can help to build an evidence base for creative policy solutions for curbing the uninsured rate among undocumented immigrants. California, home to about 2.5 million undocumented residents, introduced three relevant measures in the 2015–2016 legislative session

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In 1984, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) began requiring authors of research papers to disclose financial relationships with the pharmaceutical or device industry. The policy was controversial then, and even a decade later still faced criticism, with noted scholars charging that it “thwarts the principle that a work should be judged solely on its merits.”

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Consent Required?

May 15, 2014

Berman Institute scholars are leading the debate on the future of ethical informed consent in the pages of the New England Journal of Medicine, including a challenge from a Hopkins undergraduate student.

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