Slowly but surely, we are seeing the practical effects of the Trump administration’s efforts to sow uncertainty over the Affordable Care Act’s future. They look like the very early stages of collapse

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Nicholas Bagley: The states face two enormous obstacles to achieving near-universal coverage on their own. First, the states don’t have the same fiscal capacity as the federal government. Keep in mind that the ACA is a large, countercyclical spending program

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Premiums for Obamacare plans sold by New Mexico Health Connections could rise as little as 7 percent next year, said Martin Hickey, the insurance company’s CEO. Or they might soar as much as 40 percent, he said

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“The ACA marked a watershed moment in the epidemic’s history.”

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There are at least seven different replacement plans that Republican legislators and conservative think tanks have offered in recent years.

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15 Charts

January 4, 2017

that show how Obamacare works now — and how Republicans would overhaul it. Health care coverage has become more common in the United States than wearing a seatbelt, the AP reported earlier this year. The reason: 20 million Americans gained insurance under the Affordable Care Act, sending the uninsured rate plummeting to an all-time low. But this might be about to change

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A transformation of the delivery of health care may be an enduring legacy for the president, even as Republicans plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act

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More than 1 in 4 adults younger than 65 live with conditions that private insurers could have declined to cover in some policies prior to the Affordable Care Act, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation

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