Putting A Lid On Waste

May 24, 2017

Needless medical tests not only cost $200B – they can do harm. This overly aggressive care also can harm patients, generating mistakes and injuries believed to cause 30,000 deaths each year

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Research suggests some are seeking out painkillers when what they really need is Prozac

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Diabetics need insulin to stay alive. Increasingly, they can’t afford it

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GlaxoSmithKline says it has treated a child with Strimvelis, its gene therapy for immune deficiency

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When teaching hospitals put pharmaceutical sales representatives on a shorter leash, their doctors tended to order fewer promoted brand-name drugs and used more generic versions instead, a study published Tuesday in JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association, shows

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When Chris Ategeka was a boy of 7 in Uganda, his parents died of HIV/AIDS. And his brother, not yet 5, died of malaria. The problem, as he sees it, is that upon graduation from medical school on the African continent, newly minted health care workers are hired away for more money elsewhere, pulling the talent from developing countries to, as he says, “slightly developed countries and Western countries”

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In medicine, we speak of “seeing patients” when we are rounding in the hospital or caring for those who come to our clinics. But what about those people who may be sick but do not seek care? What is our responsibility to the patients we do not see?

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The emerging crisis is driven by low wages — around $10 an hour, mostly funded by state Medicaid programs — and a shrinking pool of workers willing to perform this physically and emotionally demanding work

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