Renda Bower knows well the cost of drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis – her husband, son and daughter all have the painful, disabling autoimmune disease. And the family’s finances revolve around paying for them

Quick Read

When the government says a new drug is approved for sale, the first thing many companies do is announce what it will cost. Not Spark Therapeutics, though

Quick Read

Facing bipartisan hostility over high drug prices in an election year, the pharma industry’s biggest trade group boosted revenue by nearly a fourth last year and spread the millions collected among hundreds of lobbyists, politicians and patient groups, new filings show

Quick Read

The drug Anderson has been taking all these years was originally approved in 1958 and used primarily to treat the eye disease glaucoma under the brand name Daranide, its price so unremarkable that he can’t quite remember how much it cost at the pharmacy counter

Quick Read

Though nine million kids across the U.S. get their health insurance through CHIP, Congress let the program expire Sept. 30. Since then, states have been burning through the cash that remains in their CHIP accounts, and parents, doctors and state officials are wondering if Congress will save what has traditionally been a popular program with strong bipartisan support

Quick Read

The generic version of Crestor — rosuvastatin — cost Patrik Swanljung of Anacortes, Wash., about $38 less when he bought it through a website rather than using his health insurance. Consumers are finding that they can sometimes save money on their drug costs by not using their insurance

Quick Read

Around the world, human-rights activists fight on behalf of people imprisoned in unsanitary jails and denied a fair trial. These victims often suffer the double indignity of being mistreated by their captors and deprived of basic services. In many countries, these abuses are not only taking places in prisons, but in hospitals, too

Quick Read

This week, pharmaceutical giant CVS announced it was preparing to buy the insurance company Aetna for $69 billion. The merger could have a profound impact on the way Americans receive healthcare — and it also raises a number of privacy concerns, said medical ethicist Arthur Caplan

Quick Read