In April, Gundy’s child, who is on private insurance, began getting the drug Spinraza, which costs $750,000 for the initial year of treatment. Chaffin’s child — a Medicaid enrollee — was not receiving the drug, as his state regulators debated whether to offer it to children like him who use ventilators to breathe

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Imagine now, that in the future, being poor also meant you were more likely than others to suffer from major genetic disorders like cystic fibrosis, Tay–Sachs disease, and muscular dystrophy. That is a future, some experts fear, that may not be all that far off

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Stacey Lee, an assistant professor at JHU’s Carey Business School, suggests a more transparent process for patients

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Patients watch health care debate with dread. The war in Congress over repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act has brought anxiety to the people whose health insurance is at risk

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“…there were some people who believed that the expansion would swamp the emergency department. Thirty-six thousand may seem like a lot of visits, but in Maryland, that only equates to about a 1 percent change. So the effect of expanding Medicaid seems to have had no effect on emergency department utilization at an aggregate level.”

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Early last year, executives at a small hospital an hour north of Spokane, Wash., started using a company called EmCare to staff and run their emergency room. The hospital had been struggling to find doctors to work in its E.R., and turning to EmCare was something hundreds of other hospitals across the country had done. That’s when the trouble began

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“Only less than 8 percent of enrollees are Hispanic, even though Hispanics comprise 17 percent of the population,” said Dr. Eliseo Pérez-Stable, director of NIH’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

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Universities and other nonprofit research institutions are under increasing fire about their commitments to the public interest. In return for tax-exempt status, their work is supposed to benefit society. But are they really operating in the public interest when they wield their patent rights in ways that constrict research?

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