Richard Friedman writes “Recently, out of curiosity, I typed into Google the terms “synthetic opioid and Chinese pharmacy.” Within minutes, I found a website where I could purchase the synthetic opioid carfentanil. For just $750, I could buy 100 grams of the drug, which would be shipped to me “overnight by discreet courier.””

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Mr. Jones enters the pharmacy expecting to pick up his prescription. But when he gets to the window, he gets a rude awakening. His acne cream is $200, much too expensive for him to afford. What can doctors do about it?

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Eye drop users everywhere have had it happen. Tilt your head back, drip a drop in your eye, and part of that drop always seems to dribble down your cheek. But what most people see as an annoyance, some prescription drop users say is grounds for a lawsuit

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Rachel Ralph works long hours at an accounting firm in Oakland, Calif., and coordinates much of her life via the apps on her phone. So when she first heard several months ago that she could order her usual brand of birth control pills via an app and have them delivered to her doorstep in a day or two, it seemed perfect. She was working 12-hour days

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At first glance, a bill passed by the House of Representatives this week seems like the kind of thing anyone could get behind. It would allow terminally ill patients access to experimental drugs without the approval of the FDA. But the bill and a similar one passed last summer by the Senate do little to address the main barrier that patients face in getting unapproved treatments: permission from the drug companies themselves

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When an assessor arrived in 2016 and went over her situation, it was a familiar process: how much help did she need to use the bathroom? What about eating? How was her emotional state? The woman typed notes into a computer and, when it was over, gave Dobbs a shocking verdict: her hours would be cut, to just 32 per week

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Opponents say the bill undermines the Food and Drug Administration’s existing compassionate use program while giving false hope to dying patients

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US prosecutors said numerous Novartis AG sales representatives will testify they plied doctors with lavish meals, booze and other benefits in exchange for promises to prescribe the Swiss company’s drugs, as a seven-year-old case moves toward trial

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