When Julia Cheek walked onto the set of “Shark Tank,” her five potential investors wore their trademark scowls. Yet within minutes, their demeanor changed, eyebrows raised and heads nodding as they peppered her with questions about her company, EverlyWell, and its promise to revolutionize medical diagnostics

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By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 percent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion

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—and why medical accuracy matters in Hollywood

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Enthusiasm for precision medicine, from the White House down to everyday physicians, is at an all-time high. But serious problems with the databases used to interpret patients’ genetic profiles can lead to “inappropriate treatment” with “devastating consequences,” researchers at the Mayo Clinic warned on Monday

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Digital gizmos can monitor your heart, whether it’s a wrist-worn fitness tracker or a smartphone app to help cardiologists analyze diagnostic tests. The question is whether they’re going to do your heart any good. The short answer: It depends

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Here’s how to spot the bad science. It’s easy to misrepresent the findings from brain scan research. Just ask a dead salmon

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Euny Hong: I did a 23andMe genetic test because I suspected I might be partially descended from Middle-Eastern medieval merchants, who were Korea’s first Occidental trading partners. (My feeble basis for this theory included my hair texture and a possible epigenetic explanation for my Jewish conversion.) But the data took me in some strange directions. As did the horrifying lack of data

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The MIT brain sciences department and, separately, a group of some 200 neuroscientists from around the world have written letters to The NY Times claiming that a book excerpt in the newspaper’s Sunday magazine this week contains important errors, misinterpretations of scientific disputes, and unfair characterizations of an MIT neuroscientist who did groundbreaking research on human memory

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