Generation Adderall

October 12, 2016

Casey Schwartz: Like many of my friends, I spent years using prescription stimulants to get through school and start my career. Then I tried to get off them

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A growing student population has been using them as “study” drugs – that help them stay up all night and concentrate. According to a 2007 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study, abuse of nonmedical prescription drugs among college students, such as ADHD meds, increased from 8.3 percent in 1996 to 14.6 percent in 2006

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Who wouldn’t be tempted by a drug that might make it easier to keep up in a world that runs at overwhelming speed? Evidently, many people agree. The proportion of Americans using Adderall, and other “study drugs” like Ritalin and Vyvanse, is increasing rapidly

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While it’s not exactly the hill stage of the Tour de France, video games require alertness and stamina. And when top-level Counter-Strike: Global Offensive player Cory “Semphis” Friesen acknowledged in a recent interview that he and his team “were all on Adderall,” a stimulant normally used to treat ADHD, during a recent tournament, the (gaming) authorities took notice

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Want to sign up for a massive human experiment? Too late. You’re already a lab rat. There was no ethics approval or informed consent. You weren’t asked, you never signed up, and now there’s no easy way to opt out

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As the school year winds down, it’s safe to assume that many college students used stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall to get through finals. While the students may have been motivated to improve their odds of getting good grades, a new study suggests that students’ reasons for taking simulants isn’t so blatantly opportunistic

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