Overdose deaths dropped sharply. A first-in-the-nation program offering a range of medications to Rhode Island inmates who are addicted to opioids appears to have lowered the number of overdose deaths among people recently released from jail and prison, researchers reported Wednesday

Quick Read

Carl Erik Fisher writes, ‘It depends on the type of coercion you use.’

Quick Read

Doctors at some of the country’s largest hospital chains admit they went overboard with opioids to make people as pain-free as possible

Quick Read

Gale Dunham, a pharmacist in Calistoga, Calif., knows the devastation the opioid epidemic has wrought, and she is glad the anti-overdose drug naloxone is becoming more accessible. But so far, Dunham said, she has not taken advantage of a California law that allows pharmacists to dispense the medication to patients without a doctor’s prescription

Quick Read

Uganda has a strategy for giving scarce morphine to patients in pain. But many poor nations won’t emulate it, over fear of an opioid epidemic

Quick Read

Designers hope the overdose treatment will soon be as ubiquitous as fire extinguishers or defibrillators

Quick Read

Seattle is poised to become the first U.S. city to allow nurse-supervised heroin use. But the pushback has been relentless

Quick Read

Why Can’t Addicts Just Quit?

November 13, 2017

In some cities, heroin addicts have access to treatment, but many are still using. Now, Seattle is poised to open a safe-injection facility for those who just can’t stop. So why can’t they?

Quick Read