Brendan Saloner, who studies substance use treatment among young people at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Berman Institute of Bioethics, said the general lack of collegiate recovery options is symptomatic of a broader problem. “We don’t have the infrastructure set up to really help anyone in most places. It’s sort of a bleak world,” he said. “People are desperate, and understandably so.”

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Small-molecule drugs are hard to vaccinate against

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“A crippling problem.” “A total epidemic.” “A problem like nobody understands.” These are the words President Trump used to describe the opioid epidemic ravaging the country during a White House listening session in March

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The agency is proposing new rules that could save millions of lives

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Addiction changes the brain in lasting ways, and some brains are more vulnerable than others

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All it took was one paragraph. In 1980, a pair of doctors published a brief letter in the New England Journal of Medicine. Spanning a total of five sentences, the letter claimed, with little substantial evidence, that the development of addiction was very rare in hospitalized patients who briefly received opioids and had no prior history of addiction

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Can virtual reality really soothe pain? Jo Marchant meets the doctors who say yes, and who hope this is a solution for the country consuming 80 per cent of the world’s opioid supply: the United States of America

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Cardiologists, surgeons and infectious disease doctors can fix the infection, but not the underlying problem of addiction. And when patients who are still addicted to opioids leave the hospital, many keep injecting drugs, often causing repeat infections that are more costly and more challenging to cure

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