Whose History?

March 8, 2019

Scholars and students attempt to correct years of archival neglect at Johns Hopkins. After securing funding from the Berman Institute of Bioethics’ Exploration of Practical Ethics program, they reached out to existing organizations at the university, like the Black Faculty and Staff Association, to get their feedback

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Bill Jenkins, a government epidemiologist who tried to expose the unethical Tuskegee syphilis study in the 1960s and devoted the rest of his career to fighting racism in health care, died on Feb. 17 in Charleston, S.C. He was 73

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Success against sickle-cell would be “the first genetic cure of a common genetic disease” and could free tens of thousands of Americans from agonizing pain

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the U.S.(other than non-melanoma skin cancer) and one of the most deadly. It’s especially deadly for black men, who are more likely to get it and twice as likely as white men to die from it. Yet black men tend to be underrepresented in research for prostate cancer treatment

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Scientists are allowed to conduct these experiments without obtaining consent from each individual participant because they are testing emergency medical procedures, and often the patients physically can’t respond

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A ProPublica analysis found that black people and Native Americans are under-represented in clinical trials of new drugs, even when the treatment is aimed at a type of cancer that disproportionately affects them

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J. Marion Sims’s advances in medical science were made through experimentation on enslaved women

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The current drug addiction crisis began in rural America, but it’s quickly spreading to urban areas and into the African-American population in cities across the country

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