Artificial intelligence is one of those tech terms that seems to inevitably conjure up images (and jokes) of computer overlords running sci-fi dystopias — or, more recently, robots taking over human jobs

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Algorithms help us to choose which films to watch, which music to stream and which literature to read. But what if algorithms went beyond their jobs as mediators of human culture and started to create culture themselves?

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A data-sharing agreement obtained by New Scientist shows that Google DeepMind’s collaboration with the NHS goes far beyond what it has publicly announced

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That way, it’ll be moral

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Humans should remain in control of robotic killing machines, the Red Cross and arms control groups have said

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Should you always do what other people tell you to do? Clearly not. Everyone knows that. So should future robots always obey our commands?

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Last week, Microsoft inadvertently revealed the difficulty of creating moral robots. Chatbot Tay, designed to speak like a teenage girl, sounded like a Nazi-loving racist after less than 24 hours on Twitter. Of course, Tay wasn’t designed to be explicitly moral. But plenty of other machines are involved in work that has clear ethical implications

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It may not strike everyone as the loftiest ambition: creating machines that are smarter than people. Not setting the bar terribly high, is it? So the more cynical might say. All the same, an array of scientists and futurists are convinced that the advent of devices with superhuman intelligence looms in the not-distant future. The prospect fills some of our planet’s brainiest specimens with dread

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