That way, it’ll be moral

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Humans should remain in control of robotic killing machines, the Red Cross and arms control groups have said

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Should you always do what other people tell you to do? Clearly not. Everyone knows that. So should future robots always obey our commands?

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Last week, Microsoft inadvertently revealed the difficulty of creating moral robots. Chatbot Tay, designed to speak like a teenage girl, sounded like a Nazi-loving racist after less than 24 hours on Twitter. Of course, Tay wasn’t designed to be explicitly moral. But plenty of other machines are involved in work that has clear ethical implications

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It may not strike everyone as the loftiest ambition: creating machines that are smarter than people. Not setting the bar terribly high, is it? So the more cynical might say. All the same, an array of scientists and futurists are convinced that the advent of devices with superhuman intelligence looms in the not-distant future. The prospect fills some of our planet’s brainiest specimens with dread

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Researcher David Silver and colleagues designed a computer program capable of beating a top-level Go player – a marvelous technological feat and important threshold in the development of artificial intelligence, or AI. It stresses once more that humans aren’t at the center of the universe, and that human cognition isn’t the pinnacle of intelligence

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The Doomsday Invention

November 18, 2015

Nick Bostrom argues that if artificial intelligence can be achieved, it would be an event of unparalleled consequence—perhaps even a rupture in the fabric of history

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Philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel argues that conscious machines would deserve special moral consideration akin to our own children

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