CRISPR’s reputation was tarnished last year after a researcher in China edited a gene in embryos that went on to develop into two baby girls. The current CRISPR trials don’t have the same ethical challenges — the therapies won’t lead to DNA changes that can be inherited, says Alan Regenberg, Still, he says, there’s reason for caution when working with humans

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Ethics in Chemistry

May 18, 2018

Nina Notman asks whether chemists should be giving more consideration to the ethics of their research. With comments from our Alan Regenberg

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The cloned animals look alike, but have distinct personalities and demeanors and cloning companies should be upfront about that, ethicists say. “What often is driving the transaction, I think, is that people want it to be a rebirth of their pet,” said Alan Regenberg, with the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics.

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Playing God

August 22, 2016

In this episode of Radiolab, NYTimes Reporter Sheri Fink pursues the question, “What happens, what should happen, when humans are forced to play god?”. Her exploration includes our deliberative engagement project

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CRISPR Conversation Starter

January 21, 2016

Our Alan Regenberg talks with Chemistry World about the ethics of human gene editing

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Where are they now? The stem-cell debate got really heated. But then … it just sort of fizzled out from public view. So whatever happened to stem cells? (w quote from our Alan Regenberg)

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Tweeting Science

April 24, 2014

Our Alan Regenberg takes a closer look at social media in stem cell science & the major role it has played in efforts to validate the controversial new STAP method for reprogramming mouse cells

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