A new paper looking at Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases finds a surprising answer to where our identity lies

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New antibody drugs show promise in slowing the advance of Alzheimer’s disease (Image: Dwayne Reed at en.wikipedia)

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Some two-thirds of the five million Americans with Alzheimer’s disease are women, in part because women live longer. Researchers have searched in vain for decades to determine other reasons for the disparity

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Identifying Alzheimer’s well before symptoms appear may become easier with a saliva test

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In this installment of NPR’s series Inside Alzheimer’s, we hear from Greg O’Brien about his decision to sell the home where he and his wife raised their three children. O’Brien, a longtime journalist in Cape Cod, Mass., was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2009

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That’s because he has Alzheimer’s. Already his memories are fading or jumbled. He forgets things he said only minutes earlier. He asks the same questions over and over and over again. And my father, an avid devourer of books all his life, has stopped reading, which has been the most heartbreaking change for me to witness

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When Sandy Bem found out she had Alzheimer’s, she resolved that before the disease stole her mind, she would kill herself. The question was, when?

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The latest reports of a dementia breakthrough illustrate the dangers of overhyping cutting-edge research into drugs and disease

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