Americans may soon be able to get their medical records through smartphone apps as easily as they order takeout food from Seamless or catch a ride from Lyft. But prominent medical organizations are warning that patient data-sharing with apps could facilitate invasions of privacy — and they are fighting the change

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When Matt Cronin worked in customer service at Nurx, a San Francisco start-up that sells prescription drugs online, one of his jobs was to manage the office’s inventory of birth control pills

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Digital health apps, which let patients chat with doctors or health coaches or even receive likely medical diagnoses from a bot, are transforming modern health care. They are also — in practice — being used as suicide crisis hotlines

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You’re in recovery from opioid addiction, and your walk to work takes you down the same streets where you used to buy heroin. The drug’s calling to you, still. Just then, your phone buzzes, with a message that reads like a text from an old friend:

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Rachel Ralph works long hours at an accounting firm in Oakland, Calif., and coordinates much of her life via the apps on her phone. So when she first heard several months ago that she could order her usual brand of birth control pills via an app and have them delivered to her doorstep in a day or two, it seemed perfect. She was working 12-hour days

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“Let me do some research, and I’ll get back to you,” my patient said

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The ride-sharing company is launching a service that allows doctors to hail cars for their patients

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A new tool helps primary-care physicians draw on medical expertise from all over the world

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