It’s a boy! A five-month-old boy is the first baby to be born using a new technique that incorporates DNA from three people, New Scientist can reveal. “This is great news and a huge deal,” says Dusko Ilic at King’s College London, who wasn’t involved in the work. “It’s revolutionary.”

Quick Read

Art and Activism Workshop

September 19, 2016

Earlier this year, Judah Adashi received from Johns Hopkins University. The purpose of the grant was twofold: first, to fund a new piece about the unseen violence of solitary confinement in America, specifically the tragic story of Kalief Browder. The second part involved the creation of a biweekly, two-hour workshop, focused on contemporary intersections between music and social justice

Quick Read

When Scott Gatz and his husband decided to become fathers several years ago, pursuing parenthood meant finding both an egg donor and a surrogate to help them conceive a baby. Their first round of in vitro fertilization produced seven healthy embryos. One of those embryos was successfully transferred to their surrogate’s womb, resulting in their son Matthew, who is now 6-years-old

Quick Read

Algorithms help us to choose which films to watch, which music to stream and which literature to read. But what if algorithms went beyond their jobs as mediators of human culture and started to create culture themselves?

Quick Read

Dead Man’s Sperm

April 26, 2016

What drives the partners of men who have died to try and have their babies? Mosaic’s Jenny Morber delves into the legally and ethically fraught world of post-mortem sperm donation.

Quick Read

When Angela Collins and her partner wanted to have a child, they reached out to a sperm bank in Georgia to look for potential donors. They thought they had found the perfect match in Donor 9623, described as a man with an I.Q. of 160 who was healthy and working toward his PhD

Quick Read

His choral reflection on America’s civil rights struggles gets Baltimore premiere on April 19 at Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church

Read More

Among 816 women who stored eggs in 2014, most common reason was lack of male partner, HFEA study finds

Quick Read