Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman’s ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra “batteries.” But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe

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When the expert opinions of doctors, government regulations, insurance limitations, and patient desires collide, who gets to decide the if, when, and how of fertility care?

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All new fertility methods sound crazy at first. Yet it’s important to understand that mitochondrial replacement isn’t genetic engineering run amok, cautions Debra Mathews of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. “No one is messing directly with genes,” she says. “Scientists are replacing damaged mitochondria with healthy mitochondria.”

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The UK is now set to become the first country to introduce laws to allow the creation of babies from three people

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Medicine

June 9, 2014

Not an art, not a science, but something else. Our Zack Berger, MD, PhD reflects on the practice of medicine

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On the air to delve into the possibility of a ménage-et-test-tube is Dr. Debra Mathews, assistant director of Science Programs at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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