Carleigh Krubiner, a faculty member at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, said, “Hopefully this will set a new precedent for ongoing and future Ebola vaccination efforts, avoiding costly delays in protocol approvals while women face the very real threats of Ebola infection.”

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An experimental drug for women revives an intense debate. In the coming days, the Food and Drug Administration will decide whether to approve an injection meant to increase women’s drive for sex. Its demonstrated effects are modest, but some doctors say the drug would meet a real need for thousands of women

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Data from a federal program designed to compensate people harmed by vaccines shows how rare it is for someone to claim they were hurt after getting vaccinated

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“We can’t stop progress with words on paper,” Denis Rebrikov said, when asked about international efforts to ban such research. Rebrikov spoke about his plans, addressing the scientific arguments against his CCR5 target and specifics about his ultimate aims and the prospect of his controversial experiment moving forward

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Someone questioned his Japanese ancestry. So Kim, 34, took out his phone and consulted the 23andMe website. That’s when he discovered his ethnic identity had changed. The site that once told him he was about 40% Japanese now pegged that figure at 5%. He was, in an instant, fully Korean again

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The agency ruled that Dengvaxia, can only be used in individuals aged 9 to 16 living in parts of the United States where the dengue virus is endemic. Furthermore, the vaccine can only be given to children and teens who have had one previous laboratory-confirmed case of dengue

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Joel Michael Reynolds writes: As a bioethicist who investigates how cultural and societal values impact medical care, I consider the position of anti-vaxxers to be morally indefensible. Here are three reasons why

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Our Nancy Kass writes, ” Open science promises considerable ethical good: speeding up medical discovery, avoiding unnecessary duplication, creating efficiencies, and encouraging more democratic science….But leaving discussions of ethics and open science simply to the good that can come and the need for privacy protections is concerningly narrow.

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