Top researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have filed at least seven corrections with medical journals recently, divulging financial relationships with health care companies that they did not previously disclose

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And patients are the worse off. Ed Silverman writes, Seeking to recover from sensational marketing scandals, GlaxoSmithKline did something unexpected five years ago — the company promised it would no longer pay doctors to promote its medicines, which had been a long-standing industry practice

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Drug companies make big contributions to analysis in the trials they fund but can fail to report their contributions

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Scientists are allowed to conduct these experiments without obtaining consent from each individual participant because they are testing emergency medical procedures, and often the patients physically can’t respond

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Researchers should embrace negative results instead of accentuating the positive, which is one of several biases that can lead to bad science

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A ProPublica analysis found that black people and Native Americans are under-represented in clinical trials of new drugs, even when the treatment is aimed at a type of cancer that disproportionately affects them

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Without any public scrutiny, insurers and data brokers are predicting your health costs based on data about things like race, marital status, how much TV you watch, whether you pay your bills on time or even buy plus-size clothing

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Funding is harder to find in general, and the current approach favors low-risk research and proposals by older scientists and white men

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