But only because we can’t. Gene experts speculate that our worst gene-editing fears won’t come true because they are too complex for us to pull them off

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Despite the appearance of agreement, scientists are not of the same mind about the ethics and governance of human germline editing. A careful review of public comments and published commentaries in top-tier science journals reveals marked differences in perspective

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In 2003, epidemiologist Nicholas Thomson was doing HIV prevention work in Chiang Mai, Thailand, when the country’s president, Thaksin Shinawatra, launched an aggressive war on drugs

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Under the direction of Rebecca Wilbanks, a postdoctoral fellow in the Berman Institute and the Dept of the History of Medicine, students have been immersing themselves in bioethics and applying what they learn to their understanding of technology, with an emphasis on robotics and reproductive technology in particular

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Geneticists have begun using old bones to make sweeping claims about the distant past. But their revisions to the human story are making some scholars of prehistory uneasy

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On the day after Thanksgiving 2018, Jennifer Doudna, whose research on bacterial immune systems led to the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR, received a startling email from the Chinese scientist He Jiankui. “Babies born,” read the subject line. (with comments from our Jeffrey Kahn)

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Despite the mounting death toll of America’s opioid crisis, most facilities that treat substance use disorders don’t offer patients buprenorphine, naltrexone, or methadone—the three medications approved by the FDA for the long-term management of opioid use disorder, according to a new study

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Written by 37 scientists from 16 countries. “It’s not a blanket approach, but when you look at the data there are certain individuals or populations that don’t need that much red meat for their own health,” said our Jessica Fanzo, “There’s a real inequity. Some people get too much. Some people get too little.”

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