Addyi Rises Again

July 11, 2018

Addyi, a drug that made a splash when it was approved in the summer of 2015 as the first “female Viagra,” is back. Its rise, fall, and rise again is an example of shrewd pharmaceutical marketing and the potential dangers it can have on patients

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Machine learning on mountain of safety data improves automated assessments

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You’ve probably heard the story of Henrietta Lacks’ cells, which spawned more than 17,000 patents, a bestselling book and a made-for-TV movie starring Oprah. The cancer cells were harvested from Lacks’ cervix without her consent in 1951. According to Johns Hopkins, where doctors took the cells, the resulting “immortal” cell line, known as HeLa, has contributed to medical breakthroughs

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Philip Loring writes that calls for strict science-based decision making on complex issues like GMOs and geoengineering can shortchange consideration of ethics and social impacts

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Genetic diagnosis is getting ever more sophisticated. But as doctors uncover diseases that are hereditary, who needs to know? Shaun Raviv explores the rights – and duties – of doctors, patients and families

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The Johns Hopkins-Fogarty African Bioethics Training Program (FABTP) aims to improve bioethics capacity development for institutions within Africa

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Study participants share their blood and spit in the name of biomedical research. Now, a national group of experts says these volunteers should be told what scientists learn about their health from those samples

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The advent of social media technology has opened many new avenues of research in population health, demographics, psychology, and the social sciences

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