A vaccine introduced a decade ago to combat the sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer has already reduced the virus’s prevalence in teenage girls by almost two-thirds, federal researchers said Monday

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In a new paper and New York Times Special Report, oncologist and bioethicist Yoram Unguru tackles one of medicine’s most wrenching dilemmas.

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Joint statement calls for all boys and girls to complete the three-dose vaccination by their 13th birthdays

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The idea that a concerted government push can lead to a “cure” for cancer is nearly a half century old, stretching back to President Nixon’s failed “War on Cancer.”

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The effort will be led by vice-president Joe Biden, whose son Beau died of brain cancer last year. US president also touts his climate-policy achievements as he begins his final year in office.

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In 2009, an influential panel of medical experts ignited a nationwide uproar by suggesting that women needed fewer mammograms than had long been recommended. Outrage ensued. On Monday, the same panel issued an update of its guidelines — and it is sticking to its guns. The basic advice, which applies to women with an average risk of breast cancer, was unchanged

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An analysis recently published in The British Medical Journal (BMJ) is not a condemnation of cancer screening itself. It’s more a condemnation of how we present cancer screening

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Earlier this year, researchers sparked a debate after suggesting two-thirds of cancer types were down to luck rather than factors such as smoking. The new study, in the journal Nature, used four approaches to conclude only 10-30% of cancers were down to the way the body naturally functions or “luck”. Experts said the analysis was “pretty convincing”

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