In February, Medicare announced that it would pay for an annual lung cancer screening test for certain long-term smokers. Medicare recipients between the ages of 55 and 77 who have smoked the equivalent of a pack a day for 30 years are now eligible for the annual test, known as a spiral CT scan

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Cancer drugs are more expensive in America than anywhere else, and their cost rises every year, causing serious economic consequences for people undergoing cancer treatment. This is especially true for Americans without health insurance who, according to a research, are asked to pay from two to 43 times the price insured patients spend on the same treatments

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Chemotherapy fees can be 43 times more than those for insured patients, study finds

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Maureen Carrigg, who lives in Wayne, Neb., was diagnosed with multiple myeloma six years ago. Even though she says she was meticulous about staying within her insurer’s network for care, she still ended up owing $80,000 in out-of-pocket costs

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The issues surrounding GMOs have never been simple. They became more complicated last week when an international agency declared that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the widely used herbicide Roundup, probably causes cancer in humans. Two insecticides, malathion and diazinon, were also classified as “probable” carcinogens by the agency, a respected arm of the WHO

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In many hospitals and clinics around the country, oncologists and surgeons simply tell cancer patients what treatments they should have, or at least give them strong recommendations. But here, under a formal process called “shared decision making,” doctors and patients are working together to make choices about care

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Decisions on a Knife-Edge

March 10, 2015

Women predisposed to ovarian cancer can reduce their risk with surgery, but with it comes early menopause. To avoid this, some doctors propose delaying part of the procedure. But is this safe? Charlotte Huff explores the costs of buying time

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When a doctor tells a patient that she has cancer and has just a year left to live, that patient often hears very little afterward. It’s as though the physician said “cancer” and then “blah, blah, blah.”

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