Our Yoram Unguru writes, “Having cancer is hard enough without unnecessary and preventable impediments such as drug shortages, which represent a particularly vexing challenge. In the United States, shortages of drugs for cancer and other diseases over the past decade have become the new normal and the problem is getting worse.”

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Surgeon Henry Heimlich is best known for inventing a way to rescue choking victims, but a quarter-century ago, he was vilified for promoting a fringe treatment for AIDS & Lyme disease. Called malarial therapy, it involved injecting patients with the malaria-causing parasite, supposedly to stimulate their immune systems

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The choice was unusual, but loving: We wanted them to live without the shadow of their mother’s mortality hanging over them

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So it happened again. An underreported story about a half-baked advance in cancer medicine caught fire and scorched its way through social media, onto network TV, and into the minds of millions of people

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Listening to the experience of my roommate in the cancer ward was like a kind of sonar, an echo bouncing back to me from my own future path, hinting at what’s to come

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Two years into Maribel’s recovery and treatment, David’s boss gathered his staff into his office. Don’t worry, he said, business is good. Your jobs are safe. But there would be one change: Health insurance offered through the company would soon be discontinued. It had simply become too expensive

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Can the agency simultaneously push e-cigarettes away from eager teens and toward longtime smokers who might benefit from them?

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Medical treatments targeting the DNA in tumor cells are celebrated, but insurers often won’t cover the skyrocketing cost

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