Some argue that good medicine depends on physicians having a wide discretionary space in which they can act on their consciences. Interestingly, those who are against conscientious objection in medicine make the exact opposite claim – giving physicians the freedom to act on their consciences will undermine good medicine. So who is right here?

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Dr. Julie Rickard thought her visit to Wisconsin over the Christmas holiday would bring a break from her day job working in suicide prevention in Wenatchee, Wash.

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Precarity, justice, and choice. The field of bioethics has worked hard to promote patient choice, especially in the context of end-of-life care

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Bob Hall was recovering from yet another surgery when the volunteer first walked into his room. Unfortunately Hall had been in and out of the hospital quite a bit. It had been a rocky recovery since his lung transplant. But the volunteer wasn’t there to check on his lungs or breathing. Instead she asked Hall if we wanted to tell his life story.

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“I asked him to bring me a gun, and he wanted to know why,” Mr. Cowart later told an interviewer. “I told him, ‘Can’t you see I’m a dead man? I’m going to die anyway, I’ve got to put myself out of this misery.’ He said, in a very caring way, ‘I can’t do that.’ It was the first of many times that Mr. Cowart, who was 25 then, would beg to be allowed to die.”

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Uninsured, undocumented immigrants often go to the emergency room for treatment. Since 1986 the federal government has required that patients in the emergency room receive care, regardless of their immigration status or ability to pay

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The real border crisis is what hospitals near the southern border see every day. It manifests as broken bones, lost appendages, and severe dehydration. It is the thousands of people marooned in ICE detention centers. It is the families seeking asylum who are met with violence…

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The Osler Medical Symposium hosted a discussion titled “Medical Ethics: Privacy and Patient Rights”. Members of the symposium joined Cynda Rushton, a professor and member of the Berman Institute for Bioethics, and Veronica Robinson, great-granddaughter of Henrietta Lacks

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