Tens of millions of dollars have been spent in a legal fight between two US scientific powerhouses, but a recent ruling by the US Patent Office could signal its end

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Even if tomato growers one day manage to produce a near-perfect fruit—one that’s beautiful, juicy, nutritious, and tasty—there’s a good chance that half a billion people would automatically be denied the chance to even try it

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A gene-editing technology that is being explored by scientists worldwide as a way of removing and replacing gene defects might inadvertently increase cancer risk in cells, scientists warned on Monday

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Authors, including our Jeremy Sugarman, offer a call to action, ‘Companies that develop and distribute tools for genome editing have a responsibility to construct and implement policies and procedures to protect the integrity of science, to educate their employees to make certain that all research conducted within the company adheres to the highest ethical standards’

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The human immune system can hinder the gene-editing tool, though there could be ways around it

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I went to a New York classroom to see how kids were being prepared for the future of gene editing.

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Last week, the US Patent and Trademarks office handed down a decision in one of the most high-profile patent cases of the century. In a one sentence ruling, an appeals board granted the rights to the powerful gene editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 to the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, while leaving the door open for rival CRISPR pioneer UC Berkeley to file a new patent to lay claim to those same discoveries

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Gene-Editing Gets A Go-Ahead

February 22, 2017

Those in the know call CRISPR “one of the greatest life science inventions ever.” It has revolutionized the ability to make precise changes to human DNA, opening the door to revolutionary ways to treat disease – but also to ethical questions about engineered designer babies. This hour On Point, the brave new world of human DNA editing and CRISPR. Guests include our Jeffrey Kahn

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