You’ve probably heard the story of Henrietta Lacks’ cells, which spawned more than 17,000 patents, a bestselling book and a made-for-TV movie starring Oprah. The cancer cells were harvested from Lacks’ cervix without her consent in 1951. According to Johns Hopkins, where doctors took the cells, the resulting “immortal” cell line, known as HeLa, has contributed to medical breakthroughs

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James Priest couldn’t make sense of it. He was examining the DNA of a desperately ill baby, searching for a genetic mutation that threatened to stop her heart. But the results looked as if they had come from two different infants

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In type 1 diabetes, the body engages in warfare with itself, the immune system mistakenly treating the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas as a harmful invader, destroying the cells along with the body’s ability to regulate sugar. Typically diagnosed in youth, it has no cure, and patients face a lifetime of insulin injections and complications

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What happened in the 1951 case of Henrietta Lacks, and could it happen again today? The story of the woman who unwittingly spurred a scientific bonanza made for a best-selling book in 2010. On Saturday, it returns in an HBO film with Oprah Winfrey portraying Lacks’ daughter Deborah. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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Johns Hopkins leaders sent a message to the JHU and Hopkins Medicine communities today about an upcoming HBO film, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The film is based on the best-selling book about the life of a woman who was treated for cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s

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Will Trump intervene? How will a Donald J. Trump administration handle these ethically delicate materials?

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Michelle Meyer writes, “…And even if it were, proposed new rules for tissue research wouldn’t stop it.”

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In an op-ed, Rebecca Skloot writes “The United States government recently proposed sweeping revisions to the Federal Policy for Protection of Human Subjects, or the Common Rule, which governs research on humans, tissues and genetic material”

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