A Norwegian startup company has created an automaton that helps children with long-term sickness be part of normal life again

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There were 136 confirmed cases of whooping cough in the state, including one that was fatal, in the first half of 2017 — compared with 66 cases, none of them fatal, in the first half of 2016, according to the Indiana State Department of Health

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I went to a New York classroom to see how kids were being prepared for the future of gene editing.

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“There are limits to what parents can do to their kids,” he said. “Medically unnecessary irreversible surgery that carries a risk of lifelong harm should be one of those things.”

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Our Travis Rieder joins The Climate Changer Podcast to discuss the moral dilemma of whether to have children in a resource-constrained, climate changing world

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Jill Neimark writes: When it comes to the genetic lottery, I’ve been lucky in a lot of ways—and unlucky in others. I was bequeathed my mother’s connective tissue anomalies, the celiac disease that runs on her side, and my father’s asthma, along with assorted other miseries. I was born by Caesarean section because my mother had a septate uterus, as do I.

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Even as high drug prices make headlines, the challenge of getting sick children the kind of medication they can take and tolerate — often by creating liquid formulations of drugs that are already on the market — is seen by some companies as a lucrative opportunity

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Given the uncertainty of outcomes of our potential children, and given the many problems humanity faces due to overpopulation, is it morally acceptable to have children? Travis Rieder and I discuss that question and many related ones in a fascinating philosophy edition of SIO!

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