Treatment of developing brains offers greater scope for improvement but also intensifies risks

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In most places around the country, if a teen has an overdose at school, nurses can do nothing but call 911 and wait for the paramedics. New York changed its laws this year to allow nurses to add naloxone to their inventory

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In “Procreation, Adoption and the Contours of Obligation,” for example, Travis Rieder critically evaluates the merits of the claim that those who wish to raise children are obligated to adopt rather than to procreate. What’s Wrong? has selected Rieder’s article as the first in its forthcoming series of featured journal articles of the month

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If we step back from the heated debates about homework and look at how homework is used around the world, we find the highest homework loads are associated with countries that have lower incomes and higher social inequality

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In Sierra Leone alone, a country of just over six million people, the Ebola epidemic has orphaned more than 12,000 children who have lost one or both family members, according to Street Child, a British charity

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Today’s regulations are designed to prevent gray areas, said Dr. Margaret Moon, a pediatrician and faculty at the Berman Institute. “Black and white is not necessarily a bad thing because we’ve made some really bad mistakes in the past and, as a society, we are reeling in those failures. But the rules can never encompass all the details of every situation. They are just a blunt instrument to do the best we can.”

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A new grant will go straight after a leading killer of kids under five: undernutrition

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Bill that would prohibit parents from not vaccinating their kids passes state senate

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