By the time Kay Schwister got her diagnosis last summer, she couldn’t talk anymore. But she could still scowl, and scowl she did. After weeks of decline and no clue what was causing it, doctors had told Schwister — a 53-year-old vocational rehab counselor and mother of two from Chicago — that she had an incurable disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD

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John Collinge, a professor of neurology at University College London who was the study’s lead author, emphasized that the observational study focused on a small group of people who were unwittingly infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) when they were given contaminated human-derived growth hormone as children

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