The cloned animals look alike, but have distinct personalities and demeanors and cloning companies should be upfront about that, ethicists say. “What often is driving the transaction, I think, is that people want it to be a rebirth of their pet,” said Alan Regenberg, with the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics.

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It was basically an aside — an odd and interesting nugget in an interview with Barbra Streisand that otherwise dealt with heavy topics like sexism and politics… But it was that one nugget — a brief comment about her dogs — that drew the most attention on Tuesday night

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With enough determination, money and smarts, scientists just might revive the woolly mammoth, or some version of it, by splicing genes from ancient mammoths into Asian elephant DNA. The ultimate dream is to generate a sustainable population of mammoths that can once again roam the tundra

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A few years ago, bringing back an extinct species was considered science fiction. That’s no longer the case. Developments in cloning and our ability to work with ancient DNA have made some scientists so confident that they claim to be on the brink of achieving the feat

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It sounds like the plot of a Hollywood science-fiction movie. An alien species is dying. Their only hope is for a brood of artificially fertilised eggs created from the preserved DNA of some of the last survivors to be brought back to life in a future world where (hopefully) conditions are better suited to them

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Sooam Biotech is the only lab in the world that makes genetically identical copies — clones — of dogs for pet owners. Nearly 20 years ago, when Dolly the sheep became the first mammal ever cloned from a mature cell taken from an adult animal, many people feared the advance would lead to human cloning

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The scientist who once fraudulently claimed to have created embryonic stem cells matched to human patients and the one who really did it plan to conduct joint research, a Korean newspaper reported this morning. A Chinese regenerative medicine company will provide financial support, according to the account

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Hit BBC show Orphan Black has The Johns Hopkins Gazette thinking about human cloning. They interview our Jeff Kahn about the ethics and policy implications

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