“It’s confusing. It’s confusing for even people like me who do this day in and day out,” Alison Bateman-House, a bioethicist at New York University who opposed the federal right-to-try law on the grounds that it would give patients false hope and could potentially lead to patient harm

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“This policy is a tiny step forward, but falls far short of what’s needed,” said Jeanne Pinder, the founder and chief executive of Clear Health Costs, a consumer health research organization. “The posted prices are fanciful, inflated, difficult to decode and inconsistent, so it’s hard to see how an average person would find them useful.”

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Regulators had accused Mutual of Omaha of denying policies to applicants, mostly gay men, who took medication to protect against the infection

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Left untreated, this viral disease can cause serious and costly health problems. Once a difficult-to-treat infection, chronic hepatitis C can now be cured by taking a regimen of daily pills for eight to 12 weeks that act directly against the virus. But there’s a hitch: This cure costs $25,000 or more per person

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As of Jan. 1, in the name of transparency, the Trump admin required that all hospitals post their list prices online. But what is popping up on medical center websites is a dog’s breakfast of medical codes, abbreviations and dollar signs — in little discernible order — that may initially serve to confuse more than illuminate

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Coverage Denied

January 3, 2019

Medicaid patients suffer as layers of private companies profit. Marcela Villa isn’t a big name in health care — but she played a crucial role in the lives of thousands of Medicaid patients in California. Her official title: denial nurse

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But that can hurt you. Few people are familiar with the term “step therapy,” but most Americans have health insurance policies that adopt it. Step therapy programs, also known as “fail first policies,” require patients to try less expensive treatments before insurers agree to pay for more costly alternatives

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A $5,571 bill to sit in a waiting room, $238 eyedrops, and a $60 ibuprofen tell the story of how emergency room visits are squeezing patients

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