Police in the German state of Bavaria will have new powers to use forensic DNA profiling after a controversial law passed today in the Landtag, the state parliament in Munich. The law is the first in Germany that allows authorities to use DNA to help determine the physical characteristics, such as eye color, of an unknown culprit

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It was 2015 when Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals and the notorious “pharma bro,” jacked up the cost of the lifesaving drug Daraprim by 5,000 percent. Overnight, its price tag skyrocketed from $13.50 a pill to $750

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What does that mean for genetic privacy?

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Johnson & Johnson uses the prospect of jail time to market a schizophrenia drug

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Rahsaan Thomas writes: “I have complained about my slowly worsening health issues since 2003. With every new symptom, I file a request to see the doctor and jump through hoops to get an appointment. At least seven of them have said the same thing: I’m healthy. I don’t believe it, though, because I don’t trust the system to care about the quality of life of a man convicted of murder.”

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“Physicians and patients have no reasonable expectation of privacy in the highly regulated prescription drug industry,” District Judge David Nuffer wrote

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State-sanctioned efforts to keep the incarcerated from reproducing began in the early 20th century and continue today

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