Since ancient philosophers first began to ponder the problem of criminal behavior, great minds in science and law have sought a single holy grail, the point at which the two fields intersect: What nervous or brain dysfunctions can explain how people become so incapacitated that they are not responsible for their own criminal behavior?

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Familial searching allows investigators to look through databases with wider parameters to identify people who are most likely close relatives of the person who may have committed a crime. But the method has raised ethical questions. Many see it as an invasion of privacy that draws an innocent group of people — and their DNA — into criminal inquiries based on their blood relation to a suspect or someone convicted of a crime

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The leads have dried up in the killing of a young woman in Queens during a jog last summer. But the authorities say that the recovered DNA could hold the key to solving the case if state officials authorize what is called familial searching, which allows investigators to search criminal databases to identify likely relatives of the offender

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Human rights groups have objected to the punishments, arguing that violence will not be stopped by violence. The Indonesian Doctors Association said administering chemical castration would violate its professional ethics and said its members should not take part

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It took 16 months and thousands of dollars, but prosecutors have dismissed the case against Katie Darovitz, one of hundreds of women charged under Alabama’s harsh chemical endangerment law

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Rise, Baltimore

April 21, 2016

Our Peter Young attended the Baltimore debut of “Rise” and reflects on his experiences

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Ransomware that locks up patient data in hospitals is disrupting medical care, and the problem is set to get worse

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A ProPublica review found 35 cases since 2012 in which nursing home or assisted living workers surreptitiously shared photos or videos of residents on social media. At least 16 cases involved Snapchat

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